Failure. Who’s to blame?

blame

Turn on any news programme and you’re likely to hear a story about a corporate scandal, political faux pas, horrible accident…and a CEO talking about being responsible, or accountable—or both.

Here’s the thing: in business and life, there is rarely a situation in which the same person is both responsible and accountable for “what went down.”

The difference is:

Accountable: One person is answerable for a project’s success or failure. This accountable person must be capable of giving a complete account of what happened (and how and why). The accountable person reports and monitors tasks as they’re being carried out; however, the completion of those tasks is rarely within this person’s direct power. The accountable person’s main assignments are managing, tracking, and monitoring progress.

Responsible: A person is charged with completing a task, directly. The person is totally in charge of (responsible for) the task’s success or failure. This person takes hands-on action, and the task’s completion is within his or her direct power. The responsible person generally reports to, and works for, the accountable person.

In most cases, when a task or project fails, one person is publically accountable for its failure—but is rarely directly responsible for that failure.

When Donald Trump (U.S. Presidential Candidate) was found to be giving away hats made in China (despite the fact that his campaign touts bringing jobs back to the U.S. from China), he was held accountable for the faux pas—even though he was not responsible for ordering those hats. (He may have been just as surprised as the public to see those tags.) Mr. Trump, because of his position, was required to take accountability for that campaign failure. He was not, however, required to be responsible for it.

We exist in a business (and life) culture centred on placing blame. When something goes right, we want to take credit. When something goes wrong, finger-pointing ensues. I believe this culture has contributed to a lot of the confusion surrounding accountability and responsibility. And this confusion has, in turn, contributed to an overall lack of accountability.

However, if we were to increase our knowledge around these concepts, we might be more inclined to put them to work. Consider this:

The probability of reaching a goal is 95% when a specific accountability appointment is made[1].

In other words, if someone is made explicitly accountable, a project is more likely to be completed—regardless of whether or not that person is responsible for its completion.

It can help to remember that, generally, managers are accountable and workers are responsible. This doesn’t mean that managers are never responsible—they often have their own tasks outside the projects they’re accountable for.

Every task must have an accountable party and at least one responsible party assigned to it. In order to keep projects and tasks on-schedule (to properly carry out the business plan), many business owners and managers have turned to the RACI matrix—a method for organising and tracking the completion of tasks. Here’s how it works:

  • R (Responsible): the worker, the person in charge of completing the task
  • A (Accountable): the manager, the person in charge of managing and tracking progress
  • C (Consult): the person whose consultation is necessary for completing the task (2-way communication before the task can be completed)
  • I (Inform): the person who is informed when the task is completed (1-way communication that may result in their starting of another task)

In order to create your own RACI matrix, simply list tasks down the left side, people involved along the top, and assign each cell with one A, at least one R, and Cs and Is as necessary. Here’s an example:

Project ABC

John Blair Sandy Rob Jenny William
Interview A R

I

     

Case Study

A I R

C

   
Press Release

A

R

C

     
Campaign A C     R

R

 

  • John is accountable for the ultimate completion of Project ABC. He must oversee all tasks and monitor them to ensure they’re being completed.
  • Blair will conduct the interview, and he will inform Sandy when it’s finished so she can proceed with the research and writing of the case study.
  • Sandy will consult with Rob for the case study, and will inform Blair as soon as it’s done so he can start on the press release.
  • Blair will consult with Sandy about the case study, so he can write a thorough press release.
  • Jenny and William will consult with Blair in order to create a marketing campaign.

It’s always helpful to share the RACI matrix with all involved before any project is started, to ensure that everyone understands their role(s). This will promote a smooth workflow, will cut down on the “passing of the buck,” and will help to ensure that clear, defined action is taken in order to fulfil the business plan.

Are you wondering how a better understanding of the difference between accountable and responsible can help you to get things done, in pursuit of business success? Then I invite you to schedule a 30-minute consultation with me. Let’s talk about your business plan, and how implementing it with purpose and efficiency can contribute to your ultimate success. Contact me here.

[1] American Society of Training and Development

Leave a Reply